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Stepan Artemyev
Stepan Artemyev

Just Dance 4



The gameplay remains similar to other previous Just Dance games, as players are judged on their ability to mimic on-screen dancers performing a routine to a chosen song. Karaoke-styled lyrics have been revamped, with lyrics being highlighted in a pre-set color. New features in Just Dance 4 include dance battle routines, which allows up to two teams of two to fight as one of the two dancers from two previous songs, expansions to the game's Just Sweat mode, unlockable alternate routines for songs, and a "Puppet Master" mode exclusive to the Wii U version, which allows a player to use the Wii U GamePad to serve as a "Master" to manipulate the routine and visuals, allowing them to create their own mashups by choosing any of the four dance moves from all four entries in the Just Dance series, as well as the ability to use the "Strike A Pose" mechanic, in which players will have to match the pose shown on the screen, while the "Master" has to choose which player earn a bonus of 1,000 points or decides not to award the bonus points.[3] Previous additional modes (Simon Says Mode, Playlists, Medley, Speed-Shuffle, Just Create, and Hold My Hand (Wii, Wii U and PS3 only)) have been dropped. Additionally, the "On Fire" motive (from mostly Goods and Perfects in a row) and effort ratings have been removed, leaving only difficulty ratings and the "Gold Move" motive, which has been dropped in Mashups. The outfits and hairstyles of the dancers are now colored in a realistic style, rather than just solid colors.




Just Dance 4


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fgohhs.com%2F2udjvH&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1e5XHZALJap2qN0pc1tpaZ



Players have "Dance Quests", six missions for each song, that can be completed. Each quest nets the player Mojo points. Downloadable songs do not have dance quests. Players can also create "Dancer Cards", which can display their favorite songs, best scores, challenges, and more. Personal leaderboards are also available for the Wii version of the game.


Note: "You Make Me Feel..." is only available as DLC if it has not already been unlocked with a Cheetos code of the exclusive, which had a minor adjustment between the two versions, as the Cheetos mascot, Chester Cheetah, was shown on the Cheetos version, and not on the DLC version.


Parents need to know Just Dance 4 is a music dance game where players follow moves presented by dancers on the screen. The songs feature some content that is mildly sexual and makes some references to alcohol. The "Comic Mischief" warning by the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is tied to a cartoon rabbit who rips off his clothes in a silly fashion. This game supports players dancing together around the same console.


Just like the many Just Dance video games that came before it, JUST DANCE 4 from Ubisoft is a rhythm-based music game that challenges players to dance in front of the television, and their movements are picked up by the Kinect sensor (Xbox 360), PlayStation Move controller and camera (PlayStation 3), or wireless Wii Remote (Nintendo Wii and Nintendo Wii U). While selecting one of many songs and dancing along with the on-screen professionals, the moves you bust are graded in real time. The game offers new modes not found in its predecessors, many genres, varied skill levels, and depending on the mode, the ability to shoot video and upload it for friends to see.


Just Dance 4 is very fun for players of all ages. While it's not very different than past games -- Ubisoft is obviously employing an "if it ain't broke" mentality -- there are more than 40 tracks to choose from, mostly from contemporary pop stars like One Direction, Nicki Minaj, Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Flo Rida, and Carly Rae Jepsen; there are classics, too, from Elvis Presley, the B-52s, and Barry White. Noteworthy new features include Battle Mode (friends go head-to-head over six rounds); unlocking alternative dance routines for some of the tracks; and an expanded Just Sweat mode that counts calories. Aside from the "deja vu" likely experienced by seasoned players, this game is a fun way to spend a night in with friends or family, with good pop music and exercise, too. Note: The Kinect for Xbox 360 version lets you create and share a music video.


Families can talk about how this game can make exercising fun. It challenges players to dance to popular songs in front of the television, plus it's also social as it encourages group play instead of solitary play.


Once you pick a mode and a song, you see a silhouette of a dancer on screen with one hand colored. This represents the hand that you, the player, use to hold the Wii Remote. As the dancer begins going through the motions of the dance, you mirror them as closely as you can. Small icons appear in the lower left corner to indicate the basic motion behind the move, and while this may seem like a duplication of information, it gives you a bit of advance notice.


I'm a fan too, although I thought they were terrible before I really spent time with one (Just Dance 3). The reviews were mostly harsh, talking about how you could "win" by just shaking the controller. It reminds me of the people who said Wii Sports was terrible because you didn't really have to make a bowling motion. This review seemed fair and did not miss the point of the game.Just Dance 4 adds more polish over 3. The visuals are better, including costumes and backgrounds, and the choreography is also better in my uneducated opinion. You can earn hard difficulty choreography of songs as well. This sort of game can turn social recluses into party animals with its strange powers. It is also great for workouts, particularly on non-stop shuffle mode. It is more fun that working out to a video, since it randomly shifts to completely different dance styles.


Just Dance 4 is the fourth main game in the dancing series where players are rated for their ability to mimic dance routines to popular songs. On the Wii platforms movement is tracked through the Wii Remote, for Xbox 360 through the Kinect peripheral and for the PlayStation 3 through the PlayStation Eye camera with optional support for the Move peripheral.


Compared to the previous version the difficulty levels have been removed as well as the option to do a quick dance to get through a song more rapidly. Also axed are various game modes such as Simon says, medley, speed shuffle, playlists, just create and 8-player. It is also no longer possible to create custom dance routines. New to the series are the dance quests where six missions are provided for a single song. By completing them mojo points, the in-game currency, are earned. On all platforms except for Xbox 360 players can create dancer cards as a profile for favourite songs, best scores and completed challenges. Just like the previous games variations on songs can be unlocked. The sweat mode from the previous game that counts calories has been developed into a fitness-like program with a different focus for each routine and they can last up to 40 minutes. It also includes warm-up and cool-down moments. Other game modes are the battle mode and dance mash-up mode. For platforms with a camera the new autodance feature records moment of the gameplay and mixes into a video.


I remember going to a local mall in the late 90s and witnessing the birth of a new kind of the dance game genre. I remember playing Dance Dance Revolution for the first time and being completely horrible at it. Crowds would even form just to watch people like me who had no dancing talent whatsoever.


Over time, I would get my own dance pad and would continue to dance badly in the privacy of my own home. Back in those days, dancing games were about skill, and it took time just to learn the basics of each song. Now, in the age of iOS games and self-playing Mario titles, the fourth installment of the popular Just Dance series lands on the Wii U.


The visual presentation is very cool, with lots of dark colors and some nice 80s neon for good measure. As I browsed the song selection, I noticed each song was represented by a crazy looking character. I discovered that this character would be what I would have to mimic in order to dance my way to victory. These include a country girl, futuristic girl, a flamboyant superhero dude and even crazy 80s styled wrestlers. Basically, what you have to do is to mimic the specific character of your choice per song and dance as if you were a mirror image of that character.


Depending on how well you do, you will accumulate Mojo, which will level you up and give you the opportunity to unlock extra stuff like new songs and workout sessions. Another nice feature for the Wii U version is the fact that you can change the dance moves on the fly as another person is playing;silly fun times indeed.


Given its massive success, we can't even feign surprise at this point that Just Dance hasn't veered far from its path. Pleased with its gift horse and eyes locked firmly elsewhere but its mouth, Ubisoft keeps it on the same track for yet another go round of light-hearted party fun. The prerequisite tweaks and fiddles to the interface and feature set that accompany an uptick in number are all here, but otherwise this is just plain ol' more Just Dance. That isn't necessarily a bad thing, really: sometimes more of the same is just swell, and Just Dance 4's large injection of new songs to bop to and choreography to master is sure to please party-goers and long-time Remote-wiedling dancers.


Just Dance 4 is a slight step back from 3 and 2, I personally felt the other two games had better soundtracks (ie more funky older stuff for dudes like me rather than the modern R&B stuff I'm not keen on). But that's just me. The game itself is awesome.


And seriously, Just Dance is the bottom of the freaking barrel. It has nothing to do with the "lameness" or anything (have no shame in playing something as flamboyant as Pop'n Music per say), it just flat out sucks.


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