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Stepan Artemyev
Stepan Artemyev

Battlefield 4 Offline Multiplayer 17 [TOP]


Battlefield 4 was met with positive reception for its multiplayer mode, gameplay and graphics, but was criticized for its single-player campaign and for numerous bugs and glitches in the multiplayer. It was a commercial success, selling over seven million copies.[4]




battlefield 4 offline multiplayer 17


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The game's heads-up display (HUD) is composed of two compact rectangles. The lower left-hand corner features a mini-map and compass for navigation, and a simplified objective notice above it; the lower right includes a compact ammo counter and health meter. The top right displays kill notifications of all players in-game. On the Windows version of the game, the top left features a chat window when in multiplayer. The mini-map, as well as the main game screen, shows symbols denoting three kinds of entities: blue for allies, green for squadmates, and orange for enemies, this applies to all interactivity on the battlefield. Battlefield 4 options also allow colour-blind players to change the on-screen colour indicators to: tritanomaly, deuteranomaly and protanomaly.


Weapon customisation is expansive and encouraged. Primary, secondary and melee weapons can all be customised with weapon attachments and camouflage 'skins'. Most weapons can also change between different firing modes (automatic, semi-automatic, and burst fire), allowing the player to adapt to the environment they find themselves in. They can "spot" targets (marking their positions to the player's team) in the single-player campaign (a first in the Battlefield franchise) as well as in multiplayer. The game's bullet-dropping-system has been significantly enhanced, forcing the player to change the way they play medium to long distance combat. In addition, players have more combat capabilities, such as countering melee attacks from the front while standing or crouching, shooting with their sidearm while swimming, and diving underwater to avoid enemy detection. Standard combat abilities are still current including, reloading whilst sprinting, unlimited sprint, prone and vaulting.


The single-player campaign has several differences from the main multiplayer component. For the most part, the player must traverse mini-sandbox-style levels, in some cases using vehicles, like tanks and boats, to traverse the environment. As the player character, Recker, the player can use two campaign-only functions: the Engage command and the tactical binocular. The Engage command directs Recker's squadmates, and occasionally other friendly units, to attack any hostiles in Recker's line of sight. The tactical binocular is similar to a laser-designator, in the sense that it allows the player to identify friendly and enemy units, weapon stashes, explosives, and objectives in the field. By identifying enemies, the player can make them visible without using the visor, making them easier to mark for their teammates. At one point, Recker will briefly lose the tactical visor, forcing them to only use the Engage command to direct his squadmates on a limited number of enemies.[5][6]


The campaign features assignments that require specific actions and unlock weapons for use in multiplayer upon completion. Collectible weapons return along with the introduction of collectible dog tags which can be used in multiplayer. Weapon crates are found throughout all levels, allowing players to obtain ammo and switch weapons. While crates hold default weapons, collectible weapons may be used whenever they are acquired and level-specific weapons may be used once a specific mission assignment has been completed by obtaining enough points in a level.[5][6]


Due to mixed reception of the two-player Co-op Mode in Battlefield 3, DICE decided to omit the mode from Battlefield 4 to focus on improving both the campaign and multiplayer components instead.[6][33][34]


DICE revealed more Battlefield 4 content in the E3 2013 event at June 10, 2013, such as multiplayer modes, and allowed participants to play the game at the same event.[59] More information was released at Gamescom 2013 in Cologne, Germany, such as the "Paracel Storm" multiplayer map and Battlefield 4 Premium. Battlefield 4 Premium includes five digital expansion packs featuring new maps and in-game content. Two-weeks early access to all expansion packs. Personalization options including camos, paints, emblems, dog tags and more. Priority position in server queues. Weekly updates with new content. Double XP events, 12 Battle Packs. Battle Packs are digital packages that contain a combination of new weapon accessories, dog tags, knives, XP boosts, and character customization items, three are included with all pre-orders of the Origin Digital Deluxe edition. The service will also transfer your Premium membership from Xbox 360 to Xbox One or PS3 to PS4. Premium membership pre-orders started the day the service was announced (August 21, 2013). DICE has also announced that if you purchase the game for a current generation system (PlayStation 3 or Xbox 360) you will be able to trade it in for a PlayStation 4 or Xbox One version of the game for as little as $10. Additionally all PlayStation 3 and 4 copies will include a code in the box to redeem a digital copy on the PlayStation Store.


An important strategy of DICE's market strategy to promote Battlefield 4 was the series of TV and web advertisements entitled Only in Battlefield 4.[60][61] Each one of these TV spots was narrated by a player of Battlefield 4 describing one of the unique experiences they encountered, along with a re-creation of the event using gameplay footage. These advertisements highlighted the free-form nature of the upcoming game, such as the destructibility of the environment and the dynamic nature of the game's combat engine. These events included things such as demonstrating the new Levolution feature, upgrades to gameplay, and unscripted moments that cannot occur in other games' multiplayer mode.


Battlefield 4 received positive reviews from critics. Chris Watters of GameSpot gave praise to Obliteration Mode and the multiplayer elements but was otherwise unimpressed with the campaign. IGN's Mitch Dyer stated that "Battlefield 4 is a greatest hits album of DICE's multiplayer legacy" for same versions.[86][87] Evan Lahti of PC Gamer stated that although the game strongly resembles Battlefield 3 it still manages to remain "a visually and sonically satisfying, reliably intense FPS".[89] Commander Mode and the diverse map selection within multiplayer were also praised as being good additions to the game. Joystiq's David Hinkle said that the game "drops players into a sandbox and unhooks all tethers, loosing scores of soldiers to squad up and take down the opposition however they choose". Hinkle praised the campaign elements, but found the multiplayer to not hold any surprises.[88] GameZone's Lance Liebl stated "Your success in Battlefield is up to you and how well you work as a team. And it's one of the most rewarding games I've played. Battlelog needs some refinement, and there's still way too many crashes, but the multiplayer more than makes up for all of it."[92] Machinima's Lawrence Sonntag praised the Levolution feature and the multiplayer mode.[90]


However, several reviewers noted that the multiplayer part of the game had been released with a lot of game-breaking bugs on PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, such as server crashes and lag.[93][94][95] Polygon reviewed the game the day of its release, and gave it 7.5, then later downgraded their score to 4 after acknowledging that the game "was still barely playable for many players".[96]


DICE later acknowledged the issues with the multiplayer part of the game and said they were working to fix them, and that they would not work on expansions or future projects until the game problems were resolved.[97][98] Despite this promise, the game's second expansion was released while numerous recurring problems had yet to be resolved.[99]


But what does this change in mindset mean for Battlefield 4? Predictably, Bach and single-player producer Tobias Dahl won't say anything about Battlefield's multiplayer - for many players the only reason they play. Nor will they discuss the inevitable PlayStation 4 and next Xbox versions. But they do talk about the single-player campaign, which, for them, is hugely important.


Patrick Bach: In general we are extremely overwhelmed with positivity, if you look at the big picture. Then what pops out is, we want more. Where's multiplayer? That's good, probably. It's not good when people are upset, of course, but it's good people are interested.


It's part of the plan. We haven't planned it that thoroughly from that perspective. It's more like, what do we want to show first? Let's show something that explains the whole game as much as possible. Playing multiplayer in front of people doesn't give the audience the full picture. It's more about ticking off: what is new with the engine? What is new with the feature set? What is new with how we handle weapons? What is new with vehicles? We tried to integrate everything into one demo. It turned out to be the opening of the single-player campaign.


Patrick Bach: I'm hoping no-one will doubt us, that we will build a decent to great multiplayer. I understand why you might be interested in seeing more about the details and nitty gritty of multiplayer. But to show something to the world for the first time, it needs to be graspable. Showing something that has a narrative and a coherent flow, that then includes on multiple levels different features, down to the very detailed features, is a must when you reveal. Otherwise we would only catch the attention of the people who are extremely avid multiplayer fans.


Next-gen needs to be more than just more polygons. To us, it's like, how do we evolve the gameplay? How do we evolve the narrative? How do we evolve the things around the technology? How do we make it more Battlefield? So, moving elements from multiplayer into single-player is one way of evolving it. How do you get people to care about the characters, is also lifting the bar, rather than just doing the stereotypical stupid shooter, where you don't care about the missions or why you're doing what you're doing, and why do these guys around you even exist?


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